Historical

The history of the house, respectively of the guild actually begins in the year 1464 when Emperor Friedrich III of the city Chur, the foundation of guilds allowed:

 
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With a diploma from Saturday after Jakobstag (July 28th) 1464, Emperor Frederick III allowed the City of Chur, which had been hit by a severe fire accident, to order guilds and guild rights, as already introduced in the neighbouring home towns.

As early as January 1465, five guilds, the Rebleute (winemaking people)-, Schumacher (shoe maker)-, Schneider (tailors)-, Schmiede (blacksmith)- and Pfisterzunft (bakers) were founded. The Rebleute guild should have been the most distinguished of all ... no wonder!

The following description closely adheres to the facts, in which 1916 Dr. h.c. Fritz von Jecklin in his script, historical of the Zunfthaus zur Rebleuten in Chur:

In 1483, the guild members bought two neighbouring houses: one by Jos Trantsch and the other adjoining by Hans von Lindau. It can be assumed that conversions were made in- and outside.

The big city fire in Chur, on 23 July 1574 fell no less than 174 houses and 114 haystacks to victim, also not spared the Zunfthaus to the Rebleuten. Soon the guildhalls stood again.

One hundred years later, on 10 March 1674, the guildhalls of the Pfister, the Rebleute and the Schmiede fell victim to a second major city fire. The Pfistern lacked now the money for a reconstruction; the ruins of their former guildhall were sold. It was different with the Rebleuten. Jecklin describes the in 1682 completed new building, which led to the installation of a loggia with decorated wooden ceiling and a large guild room with magnificent wood panelling, as follows:

 
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Translation:
Better than the Pfister was the Rebleutenzunft. They belonged to the landowners of the citizenry. It always ranked first among the local guilds and was probably the most financially strong.
Soon after the fire, the Rebleuten proceeded to rebuild their only partially burned-down dwelling, on the occasion of which, using the abandoned parterre vaults, windows and window pillars, by incorporating a loggia with an ornamented wooden ceiling opening up to the courtyard with four round arches, a substantial embellishment learned.
At the time, the Zunftstube also got a well-profiled wood panelling in the taste of the late 17th century, as well as a painted stove that unfortunately disappeared now. In 1682, as an inscription on the ceiling of the loggia says, the reconstruction was completed.

 

When the guilds in Chur were abolished in 1839, the Zunfthaus zur Rebleuten lost its original purpose. This was followed by a few hand changes: in 1850 to the judge Anton Laurer, in 1872 to Hilarius Heinrich von Grida and three years later to the blacksmith Wörner, whose son had it converted in 1916 into a guesthouse. The Chur architect Otto Manz made the necessary plans. Only then, they did the second, third and fourth floors in the front part of the building, whose facade dominates the Pfisterplatz today.

The Swiss newspaper from of construction was read in 1917: "With regard to the optic, animated by the Pfister fountain and the petty-bourgeois environment, the architect strove not to disturb the mood that still prevails here in today's environment. He will be allowed to bear witness that he has done so well, both externally and internally. "

 
Great photo of the house before of the elevation of the 2 floors at the end of the 19th century. To the right of the main building, where today is the entrance and the staircase, was still an open courtyard.

Great photo of the house before of the elevation of the 2 floors at the end of the 19th century. To the right of the main building, where today is the entrance and the staircase, was still an open courtyard.